Bootham School

Last Updated: 16/03/2018

Bootham School

York Quarterly Meeting School was opened as a private boarding school in 1822 in a house in Lawrence Street outside Walmgate Bar by a Friend, William Simpson, with the encouragement of York Friends, notably William Tuke. The premises, which were leased from the trustees of The Retreat, were purchased by the York Q.M. in the following year and in 1829 a committee of the Q.M. took over the management of the school. There were 50 boys attending the school in 1833. The school's natural history society was founded in August 1834 and is claimed to be the first of its kind in the country. The school was moved in 1846 to the nucleus of its present site, No 20 Bootham. An observatory was added in 1850, new classrooms in 1858, and warm baths in 1860. In 1865 there were 56 boarders and a staff of 5; the average fee was £63. HM Inspector reported at that time that 'the provision made for the systematic study of Natural Science is more ample than in any school I have visited'. Additions to the accommodation were made in 1871, 1879, and in 1882 when No 49 Bootham was taken over for use as a headmaster's house and dormitories. Most of the schoolrooms were destroyed by fire in 1899 and were rebuilt and opened in 1902. There were said to be 90 pupils in 1915. Further accommodation was provided in 1920 at No 38 St. Mary's and No 57 Bootham. The numbers increased to 153 in 1930 and 240 in 1956 when all, except 7 boys elected by the City of York, were boarders.
(Ref: http://www.british-history.ac.uk)

 


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